My 4th grade teacher used to scold students by sharply stating to one or all of us, that “you’re rude, you’re crude and you’re unattractive.”

Unfortunately, my fellow Americans – Employers/Hiring Managers – could sometimes use a similar reprimand.

In a recent Chicago Southland Career Network Roundtable meeting – there were many concerns shared about a serious lack of professionalism during the interview process. Aside from being left hanging for so long after resume submissions and interviews alike – the direct prejudicial (I’m calling it like I hear it) and chauvinistic behavior some individuals have been the brunt of is inexcusable.

Incidents discussed include, but believe me, are not limited to:

  • Being screened over the phone by obviously inexperienced and sometimes incoherent callers; with no sense of the technology required or other credentials.
  • Being interviewed by a much younger person who openly states – ‘you really won’t be comfortable working for someone my age’ during the interview.
  • Waiting in lobby for extended periods of time, only to be greeted by the so-called interviewer/hiring manager who states, on-the-spot, in front of others, things like: ‘Oh, you’re not what we’re looking for’ or ‘Oh, this will be really quick.’
  • Being hired for a job and training alongside a manager who is very ill & contagious;  making you so ill that you miss work and then end up getting fired because of it.
  • Accepting a job offer, only to work a couple of weeks and then find out there is no money to cut you a paycheck!

Can you believe this behavior by so-called decision makers? Yes, decision makers on the phone at the minimum, who may be a hired temp to help answer calls or reach out to applicants to make an often-uninformed decision about how much further someone might get.

Decision makers who aren’t even prepared to meet with a person whose appointment has been on his/her calendar for awhile, and acts as if they’ve never heard of the candidate.

Decision makers/hiring managers who spend the quality time (the candidates’ presumption) never even looking up at the candidate and making eye contact; and only talking about the job or themselves or the company; making little effort to inquire about the persons’ relevant experience and abilities. They got this far – pay attention!

Yes, rude & crude, presumptuous and worse. Unattractive? You’re darn right – that company is now unattractive as a prospective employer. Their reputation diminished by the unprofessional and often immature and ill-informed decision makers and gate keepers that we all have to deal with at some point in our careers.

Employers should realize that bad news/experience travels fast, from both sides of the coin. Should those companies struggling to find and retain good employees really need to try people out through stress type interviews, or just as bad – completely unprofessional? Shouldn’t all those  already inside an organization who will have some point of contact with employment candidates be trained, or at least informed about the recruitment activity going on? Shouldn’t the hiring managers and even the screeners be trained in appropriate/legal interview techniques? I would think so.

One could only hope. So when an employment candidate is doing their best to maintain a positive attitude throughout their job search endeavors – I believe they should be considered for the efforts that have been made: the never-ending online job application; the follow-up calls and letters never acknowledged, and for their own preparedness in interviewing for a job; sometimes the difficulty they encountered in finding or getting to the interview. Hopefully those gate keepers and decision makers can be prepared as well.

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