First things first. Attitude speaks volumes. It can be present in the way you write, of course the way you speak by phone, your social media interactions, and especially how you present yourself to an employer. This starts with your resume, your cover letter, and even how you apply to a job. Keep these points in mind from experienced corporate recruiters – perspectives from their side of the desk.

14207-Jim-Rohn-Quote-Work-harder-on-yourself-than-you-do-on-your-job

  1. Pay serious attention to any direction within the job posting. This could be hidden within the body of the description – sometimes to gauge who is paying attention to the direction, and who is not. When an employer anticipates a high level of interest, this could be one way they elect to weed out candidates at the onset. Why? If the candidate isn’t following a simple direction of ‘how to apply’ then how will they be paying attention to the details of the job? This is where ‘attention to detail’ comes into play right away.
  2. Proofread and re-proofread your cover letter and resume. We all can spend a lot of time working on it, get buried in it, and blinded by our own light! A fresh set of eyes can be helpful. Sending a resume with spelling errors, grammar inconsistencies can rule you out before you’ve had the chance to interview.
  3. If there are gaps in your resume that are 6 months or longer, be sure to explain them at least in your cover letter. If you happen to get laid off after a decade or two at a company and are fortunate enough to get a severance package, maybe you decide to use a couple of months to regroup. No one should hold that against you. Not everyone has such an opportunity to do so, along with the financial security blanket that may allow for such. For the most part, any prospective employer wants to know what are you doing with your time – productive, educational, caregiving, whatever.
  4. List and discuss your accomplishments in a job, not just a bullet list of duties. You may have been ‘responsible’ for some things, but aren’t we all? What makes you stand out in the roles you’ve had that could make you shine in an interview? How might you contributed to improvements, efficiencies or more?
  5. And a final note – be sure that you carefully review any cover letter, document or email. Do not send such an introduction by simply editing a letter from another. Too often, a different job is mentioned or even worse, a different employer. Dear  ABC Company, when you thought you were sending it to XYZ, and you didn’t save and re-read or re-proof that letter. When this is the case, your resume getting even a once-over is unlikely.
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